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Cameron Granger
18 hands, held high, found their Grace— but you didn’t hear a sound.
November 2, 2018 - December 16, 2018
Cameron Granger, Jackson Cage, The Boss sings ‘Keep on working’, but I can’t hear it from the bathroom, Video Still

18 hands, held high, found their Grace— but you didn’t hear a sound. is a body of new works from Cameron Granger. Through lens and text based techniques, and interrogations of Granger’s own relationship to icons like Michael Jackson and Bruce Springsteen, the exhibition looks at the idea of ‘Grace’ – both what it is, and who receives it.

Artist Statement
“I remember being alone in my apartment the morning of Pastor Clementa Pinckney’s funeral, nine days after his murder in Charleston. A sea of Black folks, mourning, held each other in the wake, and maybe against it too. At the head of the congregation, Barack Obama delivered his eulogy for the Pastor, and I, in a way not unlike the people in the room I imagine, felt cradled as the tune of Amazing Grace leapt from the President’s mouth.

One by one, the President chanted the names of Dylann Roof’s nine victims.

Clementa Pinckney found that Grace.
Myra Thompson found that Grace.
Daniel Simmons Sr. found that Grace.

And so forth. It made me wonder just what this Grace they found was, and who was the arbiter of receiving it. And I thought of all my niggas, and the niggas that looked so much like me and my niggas, and if we would ever find Grace of our own.” – Cameron Granger, 2018

Cameron Granger: 18 hands, held high, found their Grace— but you didn’t hear a sound. is a guest-artist exhibition selected from our 2018 Open Call.

Events

  • Friday, November 2, 6-10pm | November’s First Friday Reception
  • Friday, December 7, 6-10pm | December’s First Friday Reception

About the artist

Cameron Granger is an award winning filmmaker/video artist currently based in Columbus, Ohio. Born & raised in Cleveland, OH, Cameron grew up with his mother, Sandra, from whom he inherited an intense love of soul music, and a tendency for apologizing too much. He uses his work as a vehicle to explore his place both in, and as a product of American History and its media. Cameron is an acting member of MINT, a Columbus-based art collective and project/gallery space, and a 2017 resident of the Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture. His most recent projects include “Ten Toes Down” a curated screening at the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago, and “Three Times In A Row” at Beverly’s NYC.

More Info: camgranger.com