Join us for our exhibition openings December 1, 2017!
Projects

Alien She
Exhibition Documentation
March 7th – April 27th 2014
Installation view: Foreground: Lady Sasquatch (Bunny) (2006-2010); Found textiles, taxidermy supplies, appliqué borg, styrofoam, wood. Recommended Reading (2010); Wallpaper of photocopied drawings. Both by Allyson Mitchell and courtesy of the artist and Katharine Mulherin Gallery, Toronto. I’m With Problematic / Women’s Studies Professors Have Class Privilege, from the series Creep Lez, (2012): Altered t-shirts with iron-on transfer and vinyl letters Courtesy of the artist and Katharine Mulherin Gallery, Toronto. Image courtesy of Vox Populi.
Installation view: Foreground: Lady Sasquatch (Bunny) (2006-2010); Found textiles, taxidermy supplies, appliqué borg, styrofoam, wood. Recommended Reading (2010); Wallpaper of photocopied drawings. Both by Allyson Mitchell and courtesy of the artist and Katharine Mulherin Gallery, Toronto. I’m With Problematic / Women’s Studies Professors Have Class Privilege, from the series Creep Lez, (2012): Altered t-shirts with iron-on transfer and vinyl letters Courtesy of the artist and Katharine Mulherin Gallery, Toronto. Image courtesy of Vox Populi.

Alien She is the first exhibition to examine the lasting impact of Riot Grrrl on artists and cultural producers working today. A pioneering punk feminist movement that emerged in the early 1990s, Riot Grrrl has had a pivotal influence, inspiring many around the world to pursue socially and politically progressive careers as artists, activists, authors and educators. Emphasizing female and youth empowerment, collaborative organization, creative resistance and DIY ethics, Riot Grrrl helped a new generation to become active feminists and create their own culture and communities that reflect their values and experiences, in contrast to mainstream conventions and expectations.

The exhibition’s title, Alien She, is a reference to a Bikini Kill song of the same name. The lyrics are about the negotiation of normalized gender roles, the uneasy line between feminist critique and collectivity, and the process of coming to a feminist consciousness, with the repeated refrain, “She is me, I am her.” More broadly, Alien She conjures the possibilities of identity, self-determination and subversion. In the face of alienation and bigotry, Riot Grrrl fostered community, action and creation. This exhibition provides a view into the passion and diversity of the original Riot Grrrl movement, and highlights how these ideas have broadened, evolved and mutated in the work of contemporary artists.

Photo Gallery